UL BANNER

2/17/2011

Community Project: You don't know where that monster's been. (D20/D30 Table)

Is he looking at you or me?

Your dungeon is too clean. Maybe it's not your fault. After all, those gnomes on the second level are pretty OCD. They must spend several hours per day picking parasites off the hides of their pet bugbears and giant rat-steeds. And then there's that gelatinous cube on level four -- sliding its bulk through the corridors and dissolving every little tidbit of septic filth in its path. But despite the efforts of your clean-freak gnomes and acidic jell-oes, the general state of the average dungeon should be just... appalling. I mean, can you imagine how obscene the stench rolling off your run-of-the-mill lizard-man must be? Something like a wet bag of poo collected from a Newfoundland who ate too much leftover Indian food. Yes. That bad. You can't tell me that one of those guys isn't ground-zero for some sort of unspeakable crotch-malady.

It just seems that -- Gygaxo-naturally speaking, of course -- the environment of the dungeon and especially the creatures within it would be carrying all sorts of creeping crud. Disfiguring diseases, skin conditions, noxious butt parasites, eye-warts, etc., etc. Sure, there's rot grubs -- one of my Top 5 flavorite classic monsters, btw -- but they're just the tip of the old iceberg. Or they should be anyway.

The Idea
  • Sometimes circumstances require PCs to be uncomfortably close to monsters. Coming into physical contact with a monster may warrant a Funk Check (see below).
  • Funk Check: There's a 2-in-6 chance that the dungeon-dweller in question will be a Funk Carrier. If this is the case, the unfortunate PC must make a save vs. poison. Failure means that he/she has contracted some form of Dungeon-Funk.
  • Determine the Potential Severity: The afflicted PC must make a CON check. Success means a d20 roll on the table below. Failure means it's time to roll the d30.

The Community Angle
  • Fill in the blanks in the table below by commenting. Designate a result number to go with your entry. 
  • Results 1-20 should be various weird and unearthly types of dungeon-funk (magical illnesses, fungal crusts, and various other pesky/gross conditions) that are NON-LIFE-THREATENING.
  • Results 21-30 are along the same lines as the conditions described above but HARSHER and POTENTIALLY DEADLY.
  • Specify what sort of cure or method would be required to get rid of your dungeon-funk. Cure disease is acceptable, though needn't be the only way. Or perhaps your funk exhibits magic resistance? Hey, they're your genital worms.
  • This table is designated open-source gaming content. No rights reserved. 
  • Names of contributors with links to their respective blogs (if any) will appear next to their entries.

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D20/D30 TABLE OF DUNGEON-FUNK 
  1. Tomoachan's Insidious Revenge. Just like the middle-aged man at the barbecue in countless television commercials, the need to . . . you know . . . will happen at the most inopportune time. For our purposes, that time is combat. The afflicted player makes all rolls at a severe penalty unless he opts to "just let go," which will have the effect of immediately attracting every large, carrion-eating monster within a three mile radius. Skillful magic-users armed with some kind of "create food" spell may attempt an "instant fiber" variation. If successful, the now-almost-cured player will have two combat rounds of movement available to him before he is obliged to, er, sit out on this particular melee because of other obligations requiring intense concentration and a really long book. (Next time, think before you drink. Just because it's a well of standing water in a dark, dank dungeon doesn't make it safe.) [Bigby's Left Hand]
  2. 1d4 Magic Mites. The character has become a host for microscopic vermin of the eldritch variety. Different from mundane fleas or ticks, however, magic mites feed off dweomer released with magic activity. If the infected character casts a spell, uses a magic rod, ring or staff, or reads a scroll, the fleas imbibe enough dweomer to begin their transformation into gigantic pests. Not only does the spell or scroll fail to have effect, now the character must deal with the gigantic, hideous monstrosities attached to their hide. Roll d6 on the following table to determine the equivalent to what the mite has morphed into: (1) Stirges (2) Giant ticks (3) Giant crabs (4) Carrion crawler (5) Giant centipede (6) Rot grub. Note that DMs should inform the player that their character feels itchy all over when magic mites are contracted, but that there are no penalties to action and the reason is unknown. If the character pays a Sage 100 GP to check, they will find the mites. For an extra 100 GP they will also teach the remedy - bathing in a solution of orc's blood and unicorn piss. Good luck questing for both of those while unable to use magic! Note also that magic weapons and most items are immune due to the contained nature of their dweomer. [Tedankhamen]
  3. Dungeoneer's Jock Itch. PC develops an extremely irritating and itchy rash in his or her groin area. Cure Disease will remedy this, but otherwise, the condition lasts 1d4 days. The condition is so discomforting that Dungeoneer's Jock Itch sufferers get a -1 penalty to all attacks and actions while the rash persists. [Carter Soles]
  4. Nose-rot. Free-floating particulates from the creature's backside have invaded the character's nostrils and begun gnawing into the flesh of his/her nose. Chronic nose-bleeds begin in 1d6 rounds. Without treatment the character's nose will completely disintegrate in 1d3 days, giving him/her that 'skull-faced' look that typifies the veteran dungeoneer (4-6 point CHA loss). Nose-rot can be abated by a cure disease spell or the application of cloths soaked in the foetid juice of the black gnostra berry. [G. Gorgonmilk]
  5. Eye Bogies. A type of fungus/amoeba, the Eye Bogies enter the eyeball (d6: 1-3, the right eye; 4-6, the left eye) and nest on the retina, where they quickly multiply. Within 1d4 hours, they will have completely covered the retina. From that point forward, the PC's vision in the afflicted eye will be subject to strange visions and hallucinations as the light hitting the retina is filtered through the magical cytoplasm of the Bogies. The nature of these visions can vary, but possibilities include: seeing into the Astral or Ethereal Plane, seeing every living creature as dead and decaying, seeing double, triple, or more, seeing in two dimensions, losing sense of the fourth dimension of time (such that everything appears to happen at the same time), etc. Unless extraordinary precautions are taken, there is a 50% chance per day that the infection will be transferred to the other eye. [sirlarkins]
  6. The Raging Doom. During combat, there’s often a lot of blood flying round. The Raging Doom parasite is transmitted via blood and once inside its victim makes its way to the gland centres that produce adrenaline and testosterone. For the latter reason, this parasite does not seem to affect females as such; males are its primary vector. Once it has arrived at its target glands, it causes them to produce many times more hormones, causing aggressive and irrational behaviour in its victims. They tend to seek out combat situations and initiate actions that will lead to bloodshed and further transmission of the parasite. The parasite also has a secondary effect inasmuch as it stimulates production of pheromones that act as a signal to nearby predators and other creatures, causing them to home in on the victim’s location. This is probably an insurance policy to make sure that there are enemies to fight. In practical terms, this means that anyone infected with Raging Doom will cause a doubling in wandering monster rolls. [Daddy Grognard]
  7. Tenebrites. In the very darkest cave pools, there is a parasite that, when it enters its victims, causes their skin to become very photosensitive. Over the course of the following 42 hours, the skin becomes more and more sensitive, taking damage as follows: (0-7) Victim takes damage from full sunshine only, 1d3 hp per round exposed, the skin will begin to flake and blister; (8-14) cloudy days -- the skin will take 1d3 damage per round. The previous category of damage will double; (15-21) twilight -- the skin will take 1d3 damage per round. The previous category of damage will double; (22-28) moonlight -- the skin will take 1d3 damage per round. The previous category of damage will double; (29-35) continual light -- the skin will take 1d3 damage per round. The previous category of damage will double; (36-42) torchlight -- the skin will take 1d3 damage per round. The previous category of damage will double. The parasite will, however, stimulate the sight of the victim, causing them to become progressively better at seeing in poorly lit situations until by the 36th hour, they are able to see extremely well with no light whatsoever. The parasites will leave the body by means of its excrement but short of a Cure Disease, there is no real cure once the victim is infected. [Daddy Grognard]
  8. Flay Mites. These tiny organisms thrive on sunlight, but in order to get their nourishment, they produce an alarming side-effect. As soon as they enter a host, they begin to spread to all the skin cells on the body. Once they have completely infected every cell, which may well take up to seven days, they start to absorb sunlight and produce a by-product which causes the skin to become invisible. The invisible nature of the skin actually increases the nutritional effect of sunlight for the parasite, which will continue to produce the substance. The victim therefore takes on the appearance of a flayed body, although he will suffer no other adverse effect. Needless to say, his new appearance will cause considerable alarm and upset amongst those who see it. [Daddy Grognard]
  9. Luminarium. A strain of micro-organism that, once inside a victim, stimulates the dermal layers to produce a substance that glows with a vivid brightness (the same effect as Continual Light). The effect of this is that the victim is almost impossible to hide in the darkness of a dungeon environment and of course, achieving surprise is very difficult as well. A rumoured cure is to imbibe a potion made of the crushed glands of Drow Elves. [Daddy Grognard]
  10. Bite Tongue's Plague. Originally created by the ancient alchemist Bite Tongue to smite his enemies from afar, BTP is a fast-moving disease which infects the victim's mouth and throat. Those infected wtih BTP immediately find the inside of their cheeks, their tongues, their gums and their esophagus swelling with small white nodules that seem annoying and painless at first, but eventually burst and emit noxious fumes and fluids, causing much pain. This fluid itself is toxic, and is also the primary method of infection. While infected, the victum loses the ability to speak.

    Those affected must Save vs. Disease, or become infected and remain mute for 1d8 days, and at the end of that time period, Save vs. Poison or suffer 1d10 points damage. All those within 10 feet of the victim when the nodules burst must Save vs. Disease or become infected.

    Cure disease spells and potions have a 5% chance of curing the infestation. Otherwise, the only known cure for BTP is gargling this recipe recently discovered written in Bite Tongue's cramped handwriting in a tome stored under a leaky wine cask in the cellar of the Rutting Rooster Tavern in Eastern Opfalkam:

    1 owlbear beak, ground to a fine powder
    1 manticore claw, crushed
    3 drams oil of mistletoe
    2 drams oil of oregano
    1 flask fortified wine

    (Anyone can mix this curative--no special knowledge or skill check required.) [Matthew Schmeer]
  11. The Dishonourable Member. The victim of this extremely embarrassing disease will not notice any effects until the night following infection. His dreams will be particularly erotic and memorable, perhaps involving a recent conquest or infatuation. However, during these dreams, his manhood acquires a mind of its own and is able to detach itself and go off looking for nearby sleeping females to bother. In its detached state, it is likely to be mistaken for a large slug or invertebrate. It is not particularly fast-moving and can be easily trodden on. However, if this happens, the luckless owner experiences the pain even though he may be some distance away. The dishonourable member will return to its owner and reattach once its nightly business is done, full of smug self-satisfaction. If its owner is woken in the middle of a period of absence, he will realise the awful truth and must save vs WIS or become temporarily insane (either 1d10 rounds or until the dishonourable member is located and reattached)
    It is said that experienced houris (White Dwarf #13) know a spell or incantation that can cure this affliction. Otherwise, a very strong strapping device may (at DM's discretion) keep the errant part in place. If this is done, there is a chance that the victim may go insane due to overwhelming and unfulfilled carnal urges. [Daddy Grognard]
  12. Mini Me. An infestation which triggers an unusual effect if the victim takes any damage. The stress of the wound causes the sufferer to reduce in size over the course of 1d4 combat rounds. He will become the size of (assuming that he is human)

    1.Dwarf (4' tall)
    2.Hobbit (3' tall)
    3. Pixie (2.5' tall)
    4. Sprite (2' tall)
    5. One foot tall
    6. Six inches tall

    This transformation will last between 1 and 4 hours, whereupon the sufferer will return to his normal size. Note that his clothes, armour and possessions will not shrink.

    The most commonly known cure for this affliction is to imbibe a potion made from the pulped brains of hill, stone, fire or frost giants (the efficacy of the cure increases with the strength of the giant). However, there is a 10% chance that drinking such a concoction will instead inflict the victim with Supersize Me, in which he grows rather than shrinks to the following sizes

    1 Bugbear 7' tall
    2 Ogre 9' tall
    3 Hill Giant 10' tall
    4 Fire Giant 12' tall
    5 Frost Giant 15' tall
    6 Cloud Giant 18' tall

    The DM may wish to assign a slight risk of any one of these states becoming permanent. [Daddy Grognard]
  13. Ghosts of Dead Fleas. These minuscule spectral parasites are nearly invisible, appearing as translucent blue fleas. Their bite is; however, extremely discomforting and results in an itchy, scaly rash. Those afflicted suffer a -1 penalty to all attacks and actions while the infestation persists. Ghost fleas are semi-incorporeal and are very difficult to remove. Bathing in holy water or having the fleas turned usually clears up the problem. [The Drune]
  14. Burning Urine. Reputedly only caused by engaging in the good kind of dungeon-funk (aka Dungeon Lovin'), the true source of this affliction is unknown because no one will admit to doing the deed with the Harpy in Room 3A. 3d4 days after the act, the afflicted will start to urinate pure streams of fire (per Holmes doing 2d8 points of damage per turn) for 2d4 days to follow. Urinating comes randomly and causes the afflict to "fire" in any random direction, the pain causing him to lose control. Also, there is always a chance of "splash back" causing the afflict to burn himself. [JJ]
  15. The Lucky Shits. This highly contagious intestinal germ causes the victim to have intense diarrhea for 1d4 days, ultimately resulting in the victim shitting a gold piece.

    If immediately swallowed upon excretion, the gold piece will permanently increase the victim's DEX and CON by +5 each, but will also permanently lower the victim's INT and WIS by -5 each.

    If the gold piece is not consumed within one round, it will disintegrate into a fine powder, and everyone in a three-foot radius must Save vs. Disease or be infected with the Lucky Shits themselves. If the victim drinks an entire flask of vinegar before passing the gold piece, a normal copper piece will emerge instead, and the victim's CHR will be permanently raised by +1. [Matthew Schmeer]
  16. Stirge Styge, or the Blindness of Bats. Reputed to occur in those who have been exposed to the guano of stirges, this disease initially causes a mild itching and watering of the eyes (for 1d4 days with a -1 to Attack Roll penalty for that time).

    If the infected dungeoneer remains out of direct sunlight for 72 hours after exposure, they will adapt a infravision of up to 30 feet in distance and not suffer the -4 penalty to hit in complete darkness, if human. If dwarven or elven, they will have their infravision halved (down to 30 feet...) and dwarves will also lose the ability to detect traps, false walls, hidden construction, or notice sloping passages.

    The disease will cause a blindness in humans, which only becomes apparent when the character returns into the daylight of the surface world (-5 to hit when attacking in daylight). Dwarves and elves will have teary, blurred vision with a -2 to hit in daylight.

    Any other light source, magical or otherwise, will have no effect on the diseased character's vision.

    Cure Blindness will result in the restoration of full infravision in elves and dwarves, however:

    If the victim is in direct sunlight when the Cure Blindness spell is cast, the spell will result in the afflicted experiencing extreme blurred and painful vision with a -6 to hit rolls for the next 3 days.

    After 3 days, the -6 penalty will drop to -3 and then decrease by 1 for each day thereafter until their normal vision returns.

    Cure Disease will only be successful if cast before the afflicted enters direct sunlight. It will allow any dwarves to regain their detection abilities, but not their full infravision.

    It will not affect the penalties or bonuses to elven or human vision.

    A Heal spell will remove all the effects that the disease caused and will result in any penalties and/or bonuses being removed, irregardless of when it was cast.

    Half-Elves will be immune to the effects of this disease. [biopunk]
  17. Mite Be, Mite Not Be. The tiny creatures that carry this infection are believed to have originated either in the temple of the god Kuantum where the high priest Heisenberg is said to have created them as a punishment for those who relied too much on certainty, or in the laboratory of the mad wizard Schrodinger, where they lived on his pet cats for many years before moving on.

    The infected character becomes the vector for an intense uncertainty field which causes any die roll made by them to be rolled twice. A d6 is then rolled to determine which of the two rolls apply. 1-3 the first one, 4-6 the second one.

    Curing the disease means eradicating the mites, which is tricky as they are both there and not there at the same time. Strangely enough, the bite of a blink dog is a potent cure for this condition as is the venom of a Displacer Beast. [Daddy Grognard]
  18. Balding Dandruff. This annoying disease starts out as a scaly rash on the scalp and brow which develops over 1d4 days. The rash itself is only an outward sign of the disease's manifestation, and the dandruff, while severe, is merely an irritant.

    However, on the day of full infection, all of the victim's hair falls out.
    All of it. Even eyelashes.

    The infected must make a Save vs. Disease, or suffer a -3 to both CHR and CON until their hair regrows to at least a 6-inch length (normal human hair grows at 6 inches per year). Bearded dwarves suffer the penalties until their facial hair regrows to at least a 12-inch length. Halfling thieves suffer an additional -3 to DEX until their top foot hair regrows.

    If victims are already devoid of body hair, then they just get a bad case of the itchies and suffer a -1 to DEX, CHR, and CON for 1d20 days.

    The only cure for Balding Dandruff is to lather the scalp and brow with troll dung for 1d4 days. Those applying the cure suffer a -7 to CHR and CON for the duration of the cure, because troll dung is just gross. [Matthew Schmeer]
  19. The Black Blessing of Nibbith-Abn. This is often acquired by those dungeoneers who are loathe to remove their helms while sleeping. It manifests as a hazy coin-sized black diamond shape in the center of the sufferer's forehead. If spotted by a companion early on, it may be rubbed off with alcohol. If not spotted by a companion, it will begin feeling odd, much like a sweaty brow, about 24 hours after infection. If rubbed, the afflicted may notice a weird oily ash on their finger. At this point, a Cure Disease will still stop it.

    Within 1 hour of the 'sweaty brow' sensation, the center of the black diamond takes on a tacky hardened-pitch quality and begins to lose feeling. At this point, only knowledge and ingredients gained in a quest related to the Great Old Ones will reverse the process.

    Over the next 24 hours, the skin immediately around the diamond shape blackens, peels back, and falls off, leaving a roughly 3 inch patch of open skull, weeping at the edges. The skull shades darker inward to the diamond shape, which remains pitch-like in consistency but shines like jet or obsidian. During this period, the afflicted is plagued with horrific thoughts: black gulfs and yawning chasms seem to open in the fabric of the world around them; cyclopean non-euclidean ruins; etc. Insanity pts. are garnered if present in the campaign.

    After this 24 hr. period, the 'wound' stops weeping and is unsightly but 'healed.' (-2 CHR) The Black Blessing now has a life of it's own. At will, and for its own purposes, it may extend and grasp as a black tentacle up to a distance of 6 feet. It knows, however, that the death of its host will waste its time, as it will have to wait for its spores to find another living host. [migellito]
  20. Green Thumb. One morning, adventurers might awake to discover that one or both of their thumbs are painfully swollen and a light shade of green. Over the course of the day (assuming no magical healing is forthcoming) the thumb continues to swell, becoming unusable. After six hours, the thumb secretes a mucus that quickly hardens while the base of the thumb withers. One hour after this, the thumb falls off. An hour after this, it completes its transformation into a goblin and scurries off into the dark. Although as wicked as the average goblin, the thumb will retain a strange fondness for its former owner. [Matt]
  21. Stalagmorphosis.The fungus that causes this lives in clusters on the sides of stalagmites and appears to be a slight encrustation that may be anything from a deep red to a warm amber in colour. However, should anyone brush against it, the fungus at once sends out a cloud of spores that, once breathed in, begin to grow in the victim’s lungs. They do not kill the victim at once, or even affect the breathing much, although the victim may well develop a hacking cough that could cause problems in a dungeon environment from the perspective of silent movement. What is actually happening is that the fungus is producing a substance which enters the blood and starts to travel round the whole body. As it does so, it begins to affect the body tissues, causing them to swell and enlarge. After about eighteen hours, the victim will begin to resemble more a doughy parody of themselves, at least 50% larger in all aspects except height. Movement will slow considerably, and no clothing or armour will fit. The victim’s size will increase by 10% per six hours thereafter until they are too heavy to move. When they sink to their knees, the doughy flesh will begin to calcify and harden; the body will lose shape and harden as it does so until it is very similar to a normal stalagmite. Once the hardening process is complete, the fungus appears on the outside of the new formation. [Daddy Grognard]
  22. Oil Spores. Floating in some areas of water is a slimy black oil-like substance that appears to be harmless. It will not burn or sting, and merely adheres to the skin of its victim. A scrubbing with vinegar or lemon juice will be enough to kill it. However, if its victim has any open wounds (in this case, if any combat damage has not been healed completely), the oil-like substance will enter the body and its true nature will become known. It is a colony of tiny spores which secrete the mucus that binds them together. Once inside the body, they will attack the blood, using the cells as breeding grounds to produce more spores. Over the following 12-36 hours (d3 x 1d12) the victim will begin to turn grey as his blood becomes steadily more and more oily. He will die at some point within those 12-36 hours unless a Cure Disease is carried out. No wounds he has sustained will heal and after a while, they will begin to weep black oil. [Daddy Grognard]
  23. Crave Fungus. When disturbed, this fungus shoots out a cloud of spores. If any person inhales these spores, they become filled with a strong hunger for the fungus (save vs. poison to avoid this effect) and are driven to consume as much of it as possible, of course disturbing it and causing the release of more spores. The fungus, once inside a human body, will begin to produce more of itself, slowly taking over its host and causing their body to become bloated and distended until it can take no more and bursts, at which point the fungus will finally consume the remaining flesh, forming the basis for a new colony of fungi. A careful examination of the outcroppings of the fungus in this area will show that they are growing on bones and the remains of armour and clothing. Once the fungus is inside the body, only a Cure Disease spell will be able to eradicate it. [Daddy Grognard]
  24. The Writhing Darkness. These little beauties are black worms about an inch long and need to roll to hit their victim, with a THAC0 of 20. However, if they do hit, they at once burrow into the skin and make their way deep into the body, where they locate the vital organs and lay their eggs within them. The eggs then hatch into tiny larvae that slowly eat the organs away over a period of days, during which the victim sickens and withers. However, he does not die straight away. The worms are more cunning than that. As they eat, the larvae release a chemical into the blood of the victim that causes him to crave immersion in water as a respite from the pain. Once total immersion is achieved, the body bursts open and the myriad larvae are released into the water. Once the eggs are laid within a victim, only a Cure Disease can kill them. Once the larvae hatch and begin to eat, there is little hope although the DM may wish to specify a cure that will halt the deterioration. [Daddy Grognard]
  25. Undead Head Lice (UHL). These little beasties are the animated corpses of common head lice, created when common head lice infect zombies and other contagious undead. They are a common dungeon parasite, sucking the vital fluids of their hosts, but like other undead they cannot breed by normal means. UHL are only present in their adult form. If UHL are present, the DM should roll 1d6 to determine the severity of infestation: (1-2) minimal (10-25 UHL) -- hair loss and rash. -1 to CHAR or CON per length of infestation; (3-4) medium (26-50 UHL) -- hair loss, rash, minor skin decay. 1 hp damage per day if left unchecked; (5-6); massive (51+ UHL) -- undead contagion, save vs. disease. PCs making their save suffer at medium infestation level. PCs failing their save will contract Zombie Leprosy and die in 1d3 days, and will reanimate as Leper Zombies in 1d6 rounds thereafter. If a PC is infested by the common head louse, then it should be assumed that the UHL turns that common infestation into a medium or massive infestation of UHL (the DM should adjust the above table roll accordingly). UHL cannot be turned by clerics, and normal Cure Disease spells do not work to cure undead contagion inflicted by UHL. The DM may wish to specify an alternative cure for this contagion.
    A medium size infestation can only be cleared by shaving all body hair, burning said hair and all clothing worn by the PC, and full immersion of the PC in Holy Water or full body anointing by Holy Oils. Alternatively, a DM may wish to specify a cure, potion, spell, or ritual that will halt the infestation or cure the effects of undead contagion. Those slain by UHL-inflicted undead contagion will reanimate as Leper Zombies in 1d6 rounds. Undead Head Lice: HD 1; AC 9 [10], Atk 1 (bite); Move 1; Save 187; XP 1/25 Special: disease [Matthew Schmeer]
  26. Magus Worms. These can be found in the fur of, well, furred creatures. They are harmless, and will enhance magical powers... As long as there's only one group. To determine the effects, roll d4: (1-2) One group. All spells are cast as though the caster is d6 levels higher than they are; (3) Two groups. These will cast any spells that the host knows against each other. What did you say a magic missile does if cast inside someone? (4) 3 or more groups. Effects are as two, but worse. [C'nor]
  27. Giant Seed Ticks. The nymph or larval form of the giant tick, these arachnids are about the size of a typical adult tick. A total of 1d6 ticks will attach to the victim. Due to their small size, it is common (75% chance) for the initial bite of these creatures to go undetected. If giant seed ticks are found within the first few hours of attachment, removing them is almost effortless. The ticks; however, will begin drinking their host's blood and rapidly grow in size. During the first 6 hours the victim will lose 1 hp per tick every two hours. After the 6th hour, the ticks will be sufficiently large that they will be noticed by any conscious victim and they may be removed and killed with some effort. Also, at this point, the bites will cause 1d4 hp damage per hour if the ticks are not removed. This situation will be particularly dangerous if the victim sleeps without noticing the ticks. After 8 hours of blood drinking the monsters will be full grown giant ticks (2HD, AC 4, 1-4 damage per round). There is a 50% chance that each tick will transmit to the host Eiglophian Mountain Spotted Fever or some other horrid disease. [The Drune]
  28. Lich Lichen. This scaly grey-green malady can be found on any corporeal undead, but is most common with ghasts, wights and liches. If infected, patches of dry lichen-like growth will begin to show 1-3 days after exposure. After becoming apparent, it will spread rapidly, covering an area equivalent to 1 limb per day.

    For each day after it starts to show, the victim loses 1 pt. of charisma. For every 2 days of growth, 1 pt. of dexterity is lost as well. Scrubbing with holy water or oil will remove visible lich lichen, but will not cure the disease, with more growing visibly again in another 1-3 days. Only a Cure Disease spell will end the infection.

    After becoming apparent, flakes will fall from the skin regularly, and anyone coming in contact with these risks infection as well.

    Those familiar with the infection will advise against picking or peeling the dry scaly lichen. Although it will painfully (1hp per 1/2 limb peeled) separate from the raw, pus-covered skin beneath in big chunks and sheets, these will then surprisingly animate in 1d4 rounds, attacking the nearest animal life as a 1hd creature. The shape of the area peeled off might have an effect on combat.

    If allowed to entirely cover an individual, lich lichen will then turn inward, killing the victim in 1-3 days. They will thereafter rise as an infected ghast after a further 1-3 days, unless burned or otherwise entirely destroyed. Mere dismemberment will result in a multitude of the 1hd creatures instead. [migellito]
  29. Stray Neurons. The chaotic neural fibres of dungeon monsters are rarely content to stay put inside a single skull, and may leak out of a monster's ears, eyes or nose. Characters coming into contact with these sticky secretions have 1d2 rounds' grace period to try and wash them off before the stray neurons make for the nose and enter the character's brain. There they will gestate for 1d4 days, before beginning to take over. Ever subsequent day the character must make a saving throw against poison, with failure indicating that the monstrous neurons have become dominant that day, causing the character to behave as if he or she were the monster which 'donated' the stray neurons. The save operates on a daily basis, meaning that the character may behave normally some of the time. Cure disease kills the stray neurons but has a 50% chance of permanently reducing the character's Int by 1d6 points. A regeneration spell allows the character's native neurons to destroy the invaders and returns the brain to normality. [Gavin]
  30. Mind-fever. This foul affliction destroys all links of the brain to the muscles, save those needed to sustain life. The victim must make a save vs. petrification or be trapped within themselves. [C'nor]

37 comments:

  1. 01: "Tomoachan's Insidious Revenge" Just like the middle-aged man at the barbecue in countless television commercials, the need to . . . you know . . . will happen at the most inopportune time. For our purposes, that time is combat. The afflicted player makes all rolls at a severe penalty unless he opts to "just let go," which will have the effect of immediately attracting every large, carrion-eating monster within a three mile radius. Skillful magic-users armed with some kind of "create food" spell may attempt an "instant fiber" variation. If successful, the now-almost-cured player will have two combat rounds of movement available to him before he is obliged to, er, sit out on this particular melee because of other obligations requiring intense concentration and a really long book.

    Next time, think before you drink. Just because it's a well of standing water in a dark, dank dungeon doesn't make it safe.

    I shouldn't blog right after reading anything having to do with Encounter Critical, which I just did.

    Sorry.

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  2. 2. 1d4 Magic Mites - The character has become a host for microscopic vermin of the eldritch variety. Different from mundane fleas or ticks, however, magic mites feed off dweomer released with magic activity. If the infected character casts a spell, uses a magic rod, ring or staff, or reads a scroll, the fleas imbibe enough dweomer to begin their transformation into gigantic pests. Not only does the spell or scroll fail to have effect, now the character must deal with the gigantic, hideous monstrosities attached to their hide. Roll d6 on the following table to determine the equivalent to what the mite has morphed into:
    1 Stirges 2 Giant ticks 3 Giant crabs 4 Carrion crawler 5 Giant centipede 6 Rot grub

    Note that DMs should inform the player that their character feels itchy all over when magic mites are contracted, but that there are no penalties to action and the reason is unknown. If the character pays a Sage 100 GP to check, they will find the mites. For an extra 100 GP they will also teach the remedy - bathing in a solution of orc's blood and unicorn piss. Good luck questing for both of those while unable to use magic! Note also that magic weapons and most items are immune due to the contained nature of their dweomer.

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  3. Not sure if this post might be of assistance

    http://daddygrognard.blogspot.com/2010/04/something-nasty-in-water.html

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  4. 03: Dungeoneer's Jock Itch. PC develops an extremely irritating and itchy rash in his or her groin area. Cure Disease will remedy this, but otherwise, the condition lasts 1d4 days. The condition is so discomforting that Dungeoneer's Jock Itch sufferers get a -1 penalty to all attacks and actions while the rash persists.

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  5. @Daddy G: Those are perfect! As they say, brilliant minds... :-) Please pick a few to include here.

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  6. 05: Eye Bogies. A type of fungus/amoeba, the Eye Bogies enter the eyeball (d6: 1-3, the right eye; 406, the left eye) and nest on the retina, where they quickly multiply. Within 1d4 hours, they will have completely covered the retina. From that point forward, the PC's vision in the afflicted eye will be subject to strange visions and hallucinations as the light hitting the retina is filtered through the magical cytoplasm of the Bogies. The nature of these visions can vary, but possibilities include: seeing into the Astral or Ethereal Plane, seeing every living creature as dead and decaying, seeing double, triple, or more, seeing in two dimensions, losing sense of the fourth dimension of time (such that everything appears to happen at the same time), etc. Unless extraordinary precautions are taken, there is a 50% chance per day that the infection will be transferred to the other eye.

    ###

    Also, when you've got the table filled in feel free to submit it to my d30 Collection project!

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  7. @SirL: That sounds like a great idea!

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  8. 6. The Raging Doom
    During combat, there’s often a lot of blood flying round. The Raging Doom parasite is transmitted via blood and once inside its victim makes its way to the gland centres that produce adrenaline and testosterone. For the latter reason, this parasite does not seem to affect females as such; males are its primary vector. Once it has arrived at its target glands, it causes them to produce many times more hormones, causing aggressive and irrational behaviour in its victims. They tend to seek out combat situations and initiate actions that will lead to bloodshed and further transmission of the parasite.
    The parasite also has a secondary effect inasmuch as it stimulates production of pheromones that act as a signal to nearby predators and other creatures, causing them to home in on the victim’s location. This is probably an insurance policy to make sure that there are enemies to fight. In practical terms, this means that anyone infected with Raging Doom will cause a doubling in wandering monster rolls.

    7. Tenebrites
    In the very darkest cave pools, there is a parasite that, when it enters its victims, causes their skin to become very photosensitive. Over the course of the following 42 hours, the skin becomes more and more sensitive, taking damage as follows:

    0-7 Victim takes damage from full sunshine only, 1d3hp per round exposed, the skin will begin to flake and blister
    8-14 cloudy days – the skin will take 1d3 damage per round. The previous category of damage will double
    15-21 twilight - the skin will take 1d3 damage per round. The previous category of damage will double
    22-28 moonlight the skin will take 1d3 damage per round. The previous category of damage will double
    29-35 continual light - the skin will take 1d3 damage per round. The previous category of damage will double
    36-42 torchlight - the skin will take 1d3 damage per round. The previous category of damage will double

    The parasite will, however, stimulate the sight of the victim, causing them to become progressively better at seeing in poorly lit situations until by the 36th hour, they are able to see extremely well with no light whatsoever. The parasites will leave the body by means of its excrement but short of a Cure Disease, there is no real cure once the victim is infected.

    8. Flay Mites
    These tiny organisms thrive on sunlight, but in order to get their nourishment, they produce an alarming side-effect. As soon as they enter a host, they begin to spread to all the skin cells on the body. Once they have completely infected every cell, which may well take up to seven days, they start to absorb sunlight and produce a by-product which causes the skin to become invisible. The invisible nature of the skin actually increases the nutritional effect of sunlight for the parasite, which will continue to produce the substance. The victim therefore takes on the appearance of a flayed body, although he will suffer no other adverse effect. Needless to say, his new appearance will cause considerable alarm and upset amongst those who see it.

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  9. 21. Stalagmorphosis
    The fungus that causes this lives in clusters on the sides of stalagmites and appears to be a slight encrustation that may be anything from a deep red to a warm amber in colour. However, should anyone brush against it, the fungus at once sends out a cloud of spores that, once breathed in, begin to grow in the victim’s lungs. They do not kill the victim at once, or even affect the breathing much, although the victim may well develop a hacking cough that could cause problems in a dungeon environment from the perspective of silent movement.
    What is actually happening is that the fungus is producing a substance which enters the blood and starts to travel round the whole body. As it does so, it begins to affect the body tissues, causing them to swell and enlarge. After about eighteen hours, the victim will begin to resemble more a doughy parody of themselves, at least 50% larger in all aspects except height. Movement will slow considerably, and no clothing or armour will fit. The victim’s size will increase by 10% per six hours thereafter until they are too heavy to move. When they sink to their knees, the doughy flesh will begin to calcify and harden; the body will lose shape and harden as it does so until it is very similar to a normal stalagmite. Once the hardening process is complete, the fungus appears on the outside of the new formation.

    22. Oil Spores
    Floating in some areas of water is a slimy black oil-like substance that appears to be harmless. It will not burn or sting, and merely adheres to the skin of its victim. A scrubbing with vinegar or lemon juice will be enough to kill it. However, if its victim has any open wounds (in this case, if any combat damage has not been healed completely), the oil-like substance will enter the body and its true nature will become known. It is a colony of tiny spores which secrete the mucus that binds them together. Once inside the body, they will attack the blood, using the cells as breeding grounds to produce more spores. Over the following 12-36 hours (d3 x 1d12) the victim will begin to turn grey as his blood becomes steadily more and more oily. He will die at some point within those 12-36 hours unless a Cure Disease is carried out. No wounds he has sustained will heal and after a while, they will begin to weep black oil.

    23. Crave Fungus
    When disturbed, this fungus shoots out a cloud of spores. If any person inhales these spores, they become filled with a strong hunger for the fungus (save vs. poison to avoid this effect) and are driven to consume as much of it as possible, of course disturbing it and causing the release of more spores. The fungus, once inside a human body, will begin to produce more of itself, slowly taking over its host and causing their body to become bloated and distended until it can take no more and bursts, at which point the fungus will finally consume the remaining flesh, forming the basis for a new colony of fungi. A careful examination of the outcroppings of the fungus in this area will show that they are growing on bones and the remains of armour and clothing. Once the fungus is inside the body, only a Cure Disease spell will be able to eradicate it.

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  10. 24. The Writhing Darkness
    These little beauties are black worms about an inch long and need to roll to hit their victim, with a THAC0 of 20. However, if they do hit, they at once burrow into the skin and make their way deep into the body, where they locate the vital organs and lay their eggs within them. The eggs then hatch into tiny larvae that slowly eat the organs away over a period of days, during which the victim sickens and withers. However, he does not die straight away. The worms are more cunning than that. As they eat, the larvae release a chemical into the blood of the victim that causes him to crave immersion in water as a respite from the pain. Once total immersion is achieved, the body bursts open and the myriad larvae are released into the water.
    Once the eggs are laid within a victim, only a Cure Disease can kill them. Once the larvae hatch and begin to eat, there is little hope although the DM may wish to specify a cure that will halt the deterioration.

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  11. 25. Undead Head Lice (UHL)
    These little beasties are the animated corpses of common head lice, created when common head lice infect zombies and other contagious undead. They are a common dungeon parasite, sucking the vital fluids of their hosts, but like other undead they cannot breed by normal means. UHL are only present in their adult form.

    If UHL are present, the DM should roll 1d6 to determine the severity of infestation:

    1-2, minimal (10-25 UHL)- hair loss and rash. -1 to CHAR or CON per length of infestation.
    3-4, medium (26-50 UHL)- hair loss, rash, minor skin decay. 1 hp damage per day if left unchecked.
    5-6; massive (51+ UHL) - undead contagion; save vs. disease. PCs making their save suffer at medium infestation level. PCs failing their save will contract Zombie Leprosy and die in 1d3 days, and will reanimate as Leper Zombies in 1d6 rounds thereafter.

    If a PC is infested by the common head louse, then it should be assumed that the UHL turns that common infestation into a medium or massive infestation of UHL (the DM should adjust the above table roll accordingly).

    UHL cannot be turned by clerics, and normal Cure Disease spells do not work to cure undead contagion inflicted by UHL. The DM may wish to specify an alternative cure for this contagion.

    A medium size infestation can only be cleared by shaving all body hair, burning said hair and all clothing worn by the PC, and full immersion of the PC in Holy Water or full body anointing by Holy Oils. Alternatively, a DM may wish to specify a cure, potion, spell, or ritual that will halt the infestation or cure the effects of undead contagion.

    Those slain by UHL-inflicted undead contagion will reanimate as Leper Zombies in 1d6 rounds.

    Undead Head Lice: HD 1; AC 9 [10], Atk 1 (bite); Move 1; Save 187; XP 1/25 Special: disease

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  12. Magus Worms: These can be found in the fur of, well, furred creatures. They are harmless, and will enhance magical powers... As long as there's only one group. To determine the effects, roll d4:

    1-2: One group. All spells are cast as though the caster is d6 levels higher than they are.

    3: Two groups. These will cast any spells that the host knows against each other. What did you say a magic missile does if cast inside someone?

    4: 3 or more groups. Effects are as two, but worse.

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  13. Shoot. I need to edit the repetition of turning into Leprosy Zombies. I'll fix it when I turn the final table into a PDF!

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  14. Oops. That was supposed to be 26, although it would be variable depending on the spells known.

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  15. @Matt: For what it's worth, it reads just fine to me.

    @C'nor: Fixed it.

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  16. 29. Stray neurons. The chaotic neural fibres of dungeon monsters are rarely content to stay put inside a single skull, and may leak out of a monster's ears, eyes or nose. Characters coming into contact with these sticky secretions have 1d2 rounds' grace period to try and wash them off before the stray neurons make for the nose and enter the character's brain. There they will gestate for 1d4 days, before beginning to take over. Ever subsequent day the character must make a saving throw against poison, with failure indicating that the monstrous neurons have become dominant that day, causing the character to behave as if he or she were the monster which 'donated' the stray neurons. The save operates on a daily basis, meaning that the character may behave normally some of the time. Cure disease kills the stray neurons but has a 50% chance of permanently reducing the character's Int by 1d6 points. A regeneration spell allows the character's native neurons to destroy the invaders and returns the brain to normality.

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  17. 27. Giant Seed Ticks. The nymph or larval form of the giant tick, these arachnids are about the size of a typical adult tick. A total of 1d6 ticks will attach to the victim. Due to their small size, it is common (75% chance) for the initial bite of these creatures to go undetected. If giant seed ticks are found within the first few hours of attachment, removing them is almost effortless.

    The ticks; however, will begin drinking their host's blood and rapidly grow in size< During the first 6 hours the victim will lose 1 hp per tick every two hours. After the 6th hour, the ticks will be sufficiently large that they will be noticed by any conscious victim and they may be removed and killed with some effort. Also, at this point, the bites will cause 1d4 hp damage per hour if the ticks are not removed.

    This situation will be particularly dangerous if the victim sleeps without noticing the ticks. After 8 hours of blood drinking the monsters will be full grown giant ticks (2HD, AC 4, 1-4 damage per round).

    There is a 50% chance that each tick will transmit to the host Eiglophian Mountain Spotted Fever or some other horrid disease.

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  18. 30. Mind-fever:

    This foul affliction destroys all links of the brain to the muscles, save those needed to sustain life. The victim must make a save vs. petrification or be trapped within themselves.

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  19. 9. Luminarium - a strain of micro-organism that, once inside a victim, stimulates the dermal layers to produce a substance that glows with a vivid brightness (the same effect as Continual Light). The effect of this is that the victim is almost impossible to hide in the darkness of a dungeon environment and of course, achieving surprise is very difficult as well. A rumoured cure is to imbibe a potion made of the crushed glands of Drow Elves.

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  20. 28. Lich Lichen - This scaly grey-green malady can be found on any corporeal undead, but is most common with ghasts, wights and liches. If infected, patches of dry lichen-like growth will begin to show 1-3 days after exposure. After becoming apparent, it will spread rapidly, covering an area equivalent to 1 limb per day.

    For each day after it starts to show, the victim loses 1 pt. of charisma. For every 2 days of growth, 1 pt. of dexterity is lost as well. Scrubbing with holy water or oil will remove visible lich lichen, but will not cure the disease, with more growing visibly again in another 1-3 days. Only a Cure Disease spell will end the infection.

    After becoming apparent, flakes will fall from the skin regularly, and anyone coming in contact with these risks infection as well.

    Those familiar with the infection will advise against picking or peeling the dry scaly lichen. Although it will painfully (1hp per 1/2 limb peeled) separate from the raw, pus-covered skin beneath in big chunks and sheets, these will then surprisingly animate in 1d4 rounds, attacking the nearest animal life as a 1hd creature. The shape of the area peeled off might have an effect on combat.

    If allowed to entirely cover an individual, lich lichen will then turn inward, killing the victim in 1-3 days. They will thereafter rise as an infected ghast after a further 1-3 days, unless burned or otherwise entirely destroyed. Mere dismemberment will result in a multitude of the 1hd creatures instead.

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  21. 20. Green Thumb: One morning, adventurers might awake to discover that one or both of their thumbs are painfully swollen and a light shade of green. Over the course of the day (assuming no magical healing is forthcoming) the thumb continues to swell, becoming unusable. After six hours, the thumb secretes a mucus that quickly hardens while the base of the thumb withers. One hour after this, the thumb falls off. An hour after this, it completes its transformation into a goblin and scurries off into the dark. Although as wicked as the average goblin, the thumb will retain a strange fondness for its former owner.

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  22. 10. Bite Tongue's Plague - Originally created by the ancient alchemist Bite Tongue to smite his enemies from afar, BTP is a fast-moving disease which infects the victim's mouth and throat. Those infected wtih BTP immediately find the inside of their cheeks, their tongues, their gums and their esophagus swelling with small white nodules that seem annoying and painless at first, but eventually burst and emit noxious fumes and fluids, causing much pain. This fluid itself is toxic, and is also the primary method of infection. While infected, the victum loses the ability to speak.

    Those affected must Save vs. Disease, or become infected and remain mute for 1d8 days, and at the end of that time period, Save vs. Poison or suffer 1d10 points damage. All those within 10 feet of the victim when the nodules burst must Save vs. Disease or become infected.

    Cure disease spells and potions have a 5% chance of curing the infestation. Otherwise, the only known cure for BTP is gargling this recipe recently discovered written in Bite Tongue's cramped handwriting in a tome stored under a leaky wine cask in the cellar of the Rutting Rooster Tavern in Eastern Opfalkam:

    1 owlbear beak, ground to a fine powder
    1 manticore claw, crushed
    3 drams oil of mistletoe
    2 drams oil of oregano
    1 flask fortified wine

    (Anyone can mix this curative--no special knowledge or skill check required.)

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  23. 11. The Dishonourable Member
    The victim of this extremely embarrassing disease will not notice any effects until the night following infection. His dreams will be particularly erotic and memorable, perhaps involving a recent conquest or infatuation. However, during these dreams, his manhood acquires a mind of its own and is able to detach itself and go off looking for nearby sleeping females to bother. In its detached state, it is likely to be mistaken for a large slug or invertebrate. It is not particularly fast-moving and can be easily trodden on. However, if this happens, the luckless owner experiences the pain even though he may be some distance away.
    The dishonourable member will return to its owner and reattach once its nightly business is done, full of smug self-satisfaction.
    If its owner is woken in the middle of a period of absence, he will realise the awful truth and must save vs WISD or become temporarily insane (either 1d10 rounds or until the dishonourable member is located and reattached)
    It is said that experienced houris (White Dwarf #13) know a spell or incantation that can cure this affliction. Otherwise, a very strong strapping device may (at DM's discretion) keep the errant part in place. If this is done, there is a chance that the victim may go insane due to overwhelming and unfulfilled carnal urges

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  24. 12. Mini Me
    An infestation which triggers an unusual effect if the victim takes any damage. The stress of the wound causes the sufferer to reduce in size over the course of 1d4 combat rounds. He will become the size of (assuming that he is human)

    1.Dwarf (4' tall)
    2.Hobbit (3' tall)
    3. Pixie (2.5' tall)
    4. Sprite (2' tall)
    5. One foot tall
    6. Six inches tall

    This transformation will last between 1 and 4 hours, whereupon the sufferer will return to his normal size. Note that his clothes, armour and possessions will not shrink.

    The most commonly known cure for this affliction is to imbibe a potion made from the pulped brains of hill, stone, fire or frost giants (the efficacy of the cure increases with the strength of the giant). However, there is a 10% chance that drinking such a concoction will instead inflict the victim with Supersize Me, in which he grows rather than shrinks to the following sizes

    1 Bugbear 7' tall
    2 Ogre 9' tall
    3 Hill Giant 10' tall
    4 Fire Giant 12' tall
    5 Frost Giant 15' tall
    6 Cloud Giant 18' tall

    The DM may wish to assign a slight risk of any one of these states becoming permanent.

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  25. 13. Ghosts of Dead Fleas: These minuscule spectral parasites are nearly invisible, appearing as translucent blue fleas. Their bite is; however, extremely discomforting and results in an itchy, scaly rash. Those afflicted suffer a -1 penalty to all attacks and actions while the infestation persists. Ghost fleas are semi-incorporeal and are very difficult to remove. Bathing in holy water or having the fleas turned usually clears up the problem.

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  26. Man, the Dishonorable Member gave me the fucking creeps. Here is my super subtle malicious malady:

    14. Burning Urine: Reputedly only caused by engaging in the good kind of dungeon funk (aka Dungeon Lovin'), the true source of this affliction is unknown because no one will admit to doing the deed with the Harpy in Room 3A. 3d4 days after the act, the afflicted will start to urinate pure streams of fire (per Holmes doing 2d8 points of damage per turn) for 2d4 days to follow. Urinating comes randomly and causes the afflict to "fire" in any random direction, the pain causing him to lose control. Also, there is always a chance of "splash back" causing the afflict to burn himself.

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  27. This comment has been removed by the author.

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  28. 13. The Lucky Shits
    This highly contagious intestinal germ causes the victim to have intense diarrhea for 1d4 days, ultimately resulting in the victim shitting a gold piece.

    If immediately swallowed upon excretion, the gold piece will permanently increase the victim's DEX and CON by +5 each, but will also permanently lower the victim's INT and WIS by -5 each.

    If the gold piece is not consumed within one round, it will disintegrate into a fine powder, and everyone in a three-foot radius must Save vs. Disease or be infected with the Lucky Shits themselves.

    If the victim drinks an entire flask of vinegar before passing the gold piece, a normal copper piece will emerge instead, and the victim's CHR will be permanently raised by +1.

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  29. 18. Balding Dandruff
    This annoying disease starts out as a scaly rash on the scalp and brow which develops over 1d4 days. The rash itself is only an outward sign of the disease's manifestation, and the dandruff, while severe, is merely an irritant.

    However, on the day of full infection, all of the victim's hair falls out.
    All of it. Even eyelashes.

    The infected must make a Save vs. Disease, or suffer a -3 to both CHR and CON until their hair regrows to at least a 6-inch length (normal human hair grows at 6 inches per year). Bearded dwarves suffer the penalties until their facial hair regrows to at least a 12-inch length. Halfling thieves suffer an additional -3 to DEX until their top foot hair regrows.

    If victims are already devoid of body hair, then they just get a bad case of the itchies and suffer a -1 to DEX, CHR, and CON for 1d20 days.

    The only cure for Balding Dandruff is to lather the scalp and brow with troll dung for 1d4 days. Those applying the cure suffer a -7 to CHR and CON for the duration of the cure, because troll dung is just gross.

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  30. 19. The Black Blessing of Nibbith-Abn
    This is often acquired by those dungeoneers who are loathe to remove their helms while sleeping. It manifests as a hazy coin-sized black diamond shape in the center of the sufferer's forehead. If spotted by a companion early on, it may be rubbed off with alcohol. If not spotted by a companion, it will begin feeling odd, much like a sweaty brow, about 24 hours after infection. If rubbed, the afflicted may notice a weird oily ash on their finger. At this point, a Cure Disease will still stop it.

    Within 1 hour of the 'sweaty brow' sensation, the center of the black diamond takes on a tacky hardened-pitch quality and begins to lose feeling. At this point, only knowledge and ingredients gained in a quest related to the Great Old Ones will reverse the process.

    Over the next 24 hours, the skin immediately around the diamond shape blackens, peels back, and falls off, leaving a roughly 3 inch patch of open skull, weeping at the edges. The skull shades darker inward to the diamond shape, which remains pitch-like in consistency but shines like jet or obsidian. During this period, the afflicted is plagued with horrific thoughts: black gulfs and yawning chasms seem to open in the fabric of the world around them; cyclopean non-euclidean ruins; etc. Insanity pts. are garnered if present in the campaign.

    After this 24 hr. period, the 'wound' stops weeping and is unsightly but 'healed.' (-2 CHR) The Black Blessing now has a life of it's own. At will, and for its own purposes, it may extend and grasp as a black tentacle up to a distance of 6 feet. It knows, however, that the death of its host will waste its time, as it will have to wait for its spores to find another living host.

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  31. Stirge Styge, or the Blindness of Bats:

    Reputed to occur in those who have been exposed to the guano of stirges, this disease initially causes a mild itching and watering of the eyes (for 1d4 days with a -1 to Attack Roll penalty for that time).

    If the infected dungeoneer remains out of direct sunlight for 72 hours after exposure, they will adapt a infravision of up to 30 feet in distance and not suffer the -4 penalty to hit in complete darkness, if human. If dwarven or elven, they will have their infravision halved (down to 30 feet...) and dwarves will also lose the ability to detect traps, false walls, hidden construction, or notice sloping passages.

    The disease will cause a blindness in humans, which only becomes apparent when the character returns into the daylight of the surface world (-5 to hit when attacking in daylight). Dwarves and elves will have teary, blurred vision with a -2 to hit in daylight.

    Any other light source, magical or otherwise, will have no effect on the diseased character's vision.

    Cure Blindness will result in the restoration of full infravision in elves and dwarves, however:

    If the victim is in direct sunlight when the Cure Blindness spell is cast, the spell will result in the afflicted experiencing extreme blurred and painful vision with a -6 to hit rolls for the next 3 days.

    After 3 days, the -6 penalty will drop to -3 and then decrease by 1 for each day thereafter until their normal vision returns.

    Cure Disease will only be successful if cast before the afflicted enters direct sunlight. It will allow any dwarves to regain their detection abilities, but not their full infravision.

    It will not affect the penalties or bonuses to elven or human vision.

    A Heal spell will remove all the effects that the disease caused and will result in any penalties and/or bonuses being removed, irregardless of when it was cast.

    Half-Elves will be immune to the effects of this disease.

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  32. Wow--I would have so loved to have contributed something suitably icky to this table...maybe next time...

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  33. @NW: No worries! The next community project will post soon.

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  34. Hey Greg, I just linked to this awesome table from the Links to Wisdom OSR wiki (took me a while to work out where on earth to put it!). Then I noticed that number 17 is still blank!

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  35. Okay, has any gaming group actually used this in play?

    Does any gaming group actually use this in play more than once?

    If I tried to pull something like this, my players would crumple up their character sheets, throw them at me, and walk out.

    How many groups actually *use* these rules?

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  36. @postgygaxian: The guys I play with think it's hilarious. But then I've never seen them crumple up a sheet either. They're pretty good sports. I've definitely played with dudes who take it way too seriously, so I know where you're coming from.

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